Ike: Compare and contrast

We were in Sugar Land for three days. There are downed trees there, maybe three or four in an area of one hundred homes. There are probably forty or fifty big limbs down. One house lost some shingles off the roof. But that was it.

We came home and the lights are still down. But at the first main light there were two police officers directing traffic. But when rush hour began thirty minutes later, they were gone. What’s up with that?

The main light in the whole neighborhood is out, but it hasn’t been too bad. People are generally pretty good about following the rules.

Our neighbors are all out in their yards, sitting on chairs and having discussions. It’s fun and yet odd. Normally there isn’t anyone out in our neighborhood except the children.

Is it the contrast? (Ike)

R went home today because his work has electricity. None of the lights in our part of the subdivision are working, so it takes a long time to get home from work during rush hour. Trees, many trees, are down. There is some power in our section of town, but 85% in our area code are without power.

We came to my folks’ on Monday afternoon. Here we have electricity, internet, an open mall. There are still people around here who have no electricity. There’s a FEMA POD (point of distribution) right up the road, handing out ice and water. There are whole families gathered in the bookstores, reading books in a circle and plugging in their phones or computers.

But it’s better than around our house, where there is no electricity.

Gas is still scarce. Gas stations here (and all over town) have closed off all but one entrance and exit and have people manning the entrances to let people in and out. Some (two of four) on the way home from the highway to our house are closed. They have no gasoline.

Everyone with any sense (I’d guess 80%) filled up before the hurricane. But driving around to find a grocery store, if you need one, and waiting at a FEMA POD will use up a lot of gas. Plus, after a few days those of us who usually drive a lot were going stir crazy in our homes. If it’d been dangerous we would have stayed home, but it wasn’t, so we were driving a bit.

We own a lot of cars (four) and they are all filled up. When we lost the back windshield of the Pontiac, that is the one we decided to run to power up our phones. Amazingly, though landlines are down everywhere, we do have cell phones. The lines are busy regularly, but they’re available. You don’t feel totally out of touch.

Centerpoint Energy says Houston will have 50-75% power by Tuesday. I don’t know if that is a pessimistic prediction, so they can meet their goals or an optimistic prediction, because they are being pressured to say something good. We’ll see. It’s been five full days and we still don’t have power. (Our transformer was hit by a tree and taken out before the storm actually hit, just the winds brought it down. So we lost power Friday night.)

R is home tonight because church was supposed to be meeting. It’s not. But it was supposed to be.

He said the devastation around our area, which didn’t seem anywhere near as bad as we were expecting, seemed much worse after being down near my parents. There are lots of trees down here and some shingles and shutters missing, but overall there is little damage.

In our subdivision, I’d say 1 in 20 people had a tree do visible damage to their home. One in two lost fence. I’d say probably 1 in 10 lost big trees or big limbs.

So I don’t think it is the contrast. I think it is the reality.

Very few people died. There was not widespread flooding. Some people are complaining about the government not being here fast enough. But overall, we were very blessed. There was not the devastation we were concerned about.

But one in twenty houses have visible damage. Think about that as you drive down the block.

Flight 93 Memorial

Blogburst logo, petition

Gordon Felt, president of the Flight 93 family group that supports the crescent shaped memorial, offered a nice summary statement of the heroism of Flight 93:

They had some forewarning and they chose to take action.

“It’s that citizen soldier, heroism message,” he said “that we want to get out and memorialize their actions.”

Mr. Felt also has forewarning of an enemy plot, but he and the other defenders of the crescent design are choosing not to act. They are displaying a perfect anti-spirit of Flight 93.

According to Flight 93 Advisory Commission member Tim Baird, they all know that all of our basic claims about the crescent design are accurate: the Mecca orientation of the giant crescent; the 44 translucent blocks that are to be placed along the flight path, etcetera. Yet they and their allies in the press are doing everything in their power to keep the public from knowing what they know.

Example 1: PA paper reports Mecca orientation controversy, omits its own verification of the Mecca orientation of the crescent.

In last week’s anniversary coverage of the 9/11 attacks, the Johnstown Tribune Democrat noted the controversy over the orientation of the crescent. We say it points to Mecca. The Park Service denies it:

The project also has been dogged by complaints spearheaded by California author Alec Rawls that the memorial points to Mecca and is a veiled tribute to the Islamic terrorists – a claim family members and developers maintain has been investigated and refuted.

What reporter Kirk Swauger fails to mention is that he himself fact-checked the Mecca-orientation claim last year, and published his findings:

Rawls maintains that the midpoint between the tips of the crescent points almost precisely toward “qibla,” the direction to Mecca, which Muslims are supposed to face for prayer.

His claims seem to be backed up by coordinates for the direction of qibla from Somerset that can be found on Islam.com. When superimposed over the crescent in the memorial design, the midpoint points over the Arctic Circle, through Europe toward Mecca.

This is the only instance in three years now where any news organization has ever published any fact-checking of our easy to fact check claims about the memorial design. Alec has several times emailed Kirk’s published confirmation of the Mecca-orientation to every newsdesk in Pennsylvania and to every reporter covering the memorial story. They ALL know about it. Yet even Kirk continues to present the Mecca orientation claim as a “he said, she said” conflict, without letting his readers know that he has verified the Mecca-orientation for himself (and this isn’t the first time he has made this omission).

If Mr. Swauger really wanted everyone to forget his confirmation of the Mecca-orientation, he could just avoid any mention of the orientation of the crescent at all. Alec’s best guess is that Kirk is being held back by Tribune Democrat editor Chip Minemyer, who has tried to sweep the memorial controversy under the rug from day one, but the reporters are also neck deep. Several have suggested that to investigate and report on the accuracy of our claims would be taking sides. Of course that phony “scruple” would disappear in a second if the facts showed our criticisms to be bogus.

Example 2: Gordon Felt himself misled the public about the 44 blocks.

The Crescent of Embrace design, now called the (broken) Circle of Embrace, calls for a total of 44 inscribed translucent memorial blocks to be placed along the flight path. (There were forty passengers and crew on Flight 93 and four terrorists.)

In trying to get this information out to the public, we need to be brief, so “44 inscribed translucent memorial blocks” sometimes gets shortened to “44 glass blocks,” or “44 blocks.” Asked last spring about the 44 blocks, Gordon Felt declared it a lie:

Opponents also claim there is a plan to have 44 glass blocks — for the 40 victims and four hijackers — in the design.

“That’s an absolute, unequivocal fabrication that is being portrayed as fact,” said Edward Felt’s brother, Gordon Felt, president of Families of Flight 93. “It’s misleading and helps drive the conspiracy theory.”

But he follows this denial with a footnote, indicating that he knows full well that there will be 44 memorial blocks:

Felt said the names of the passengers and crew will be placed on the memorial, but no final decision has been made on how they would be displayed or on what material.

In other words, he is nit-picking over our occasional description of the blocks as “glass blocks,” when they might not all be technically made of glass.

As Alec’s original report to the Memorial Project made clear, 43 of the blocks are described in the design drawings as “polished, translucent white marble”:

Memorial Walls, 43 "glass" blocks, 45%
Click pic for larger image.

The lower section of wall, on the left, contains forty of the “translucent white marble” blocks or panels (backlit at night), inscribed with the names of the forty heroes. The upper section of wall, on the right, contains three more blocks, inscribed with the 9/11 date.

That upper section of wall, by the way, is centered on the bisector of the giant crescent, placing it in the exact position of the star on an Islamic crescent and star flag. Thus the date goes to the Islamic star. The date goes to the terrorists.

Here is the 44th block on the flight path. It marks the upper crescent tip, where according to the Park Service’s own website, the flight path symbolically breaks our (Christian) circle, turning it into the giant (Mecca oriented) crescent. A clearer depiction of al Qaeda victory is hard to imagine, and it all comes together right here:

Large glass block at upper crescent tip
At the end of the Entry Portal Walkway (after the walkway symbolically “breaks” the towering Entry Portal Walls) sits a large “glass memorial plaque” that dedicates the entire site.

This 44th translucent block on the flight path marks the spot where the terrorists symbolically broke our harmonious circle and turned it into a giant Islamic shaped crescent. To be inscribed: “A field of honor forever.”

Gordon Felt knows ALL of this, and is trying to keep the public from knowing. It’s as if someone on Flight 93, hearing from the ground that airplanes had crashed into the Trade Towers, insisted to the other passengers that NO airplanes had crashed into the Trade Towers.

Apparently grief has made these people crazy. They have forewarning, and are struggling with all their might to keep others from being forewarned as well.

Getting crowded.

My sister is being kicked out of her hotel in Austin because other Houstonians actually made reservations to come in and fill up the hotel. She’s just been staying there without reservations.

They’re coming home today, but since they have no a/c, they’ll be coming to stay with my folks.

That’ll be eleven people and three dogs in a house that usually has two and one.

We’re all alive and our houses are okay.

Check out the website.

The oddest thing about the hurricane was how everyone kept telling us to “check out the website.” If I could check out the website, would I be listening to a battery operated radio in the dark? No, I would not.

Check out the website. Phooey.

Ike

Friday:
9:30 Our friends left because the wind was picking up and they needed to let the dog out.

10:15 The wind has picked up. Our electricity is going off and on. We don’t have internet now.

10: 25 The lights are going out and staying out for longer. Our friend is asking us if our lights are going off and on.
10:35 The lights are out.
11:00 R is going to bed and wants me to stay up.
3:00 something is hitting our roof.

Saturday:
7:15 My folks are okay.
7:40 My sister Stephanie, who lives three stories over a creek, has water up to her yard. So 20 feet higher.
10:00 The main highways are closed. But my sister decided she would leave anyway. She’s on her way to Austin. She said the highway wasn’t closed where she was, though there were power lines down.
11:30 pm Everyone is asleep but me. It’s hot and I’ve wet down a washcloth and wave it in the air and then lay it on my skin to cool it down.
The neighbor lost a front porch and was lucky at that since she had three or four huge trees come down in her yard.
Others, just a street away, had trees come in their houses.
And we’re told a cold front is coming in tomorrow. (YEAH!) But that it is bringing rain with it. So the flash flood warnings will continue until after the rains.
We’ve played Peanuts (or Nerts) and read books. I walked around the neighborhood a bit, but it is hot and no one else in my family wanted to go outside.
R and I had baloney and cheese sandwiches for dinner. I think the food that is still left in the fridge will be a loss. I’m going to eat cheese for breakfast tomorrow.
The boys had peanut butter sandwiches and pineapple out of a can.
We have food and water for a week, but I hope we’ll get power back sooner. If we’re still without power on Sunday evening, I’m thinking we should head out. Or maybe on Monday morning. Of course, if I have to work on Tuesday, that could be an issue.

Sunday:
It’s hot and raining. I hope the cool air comes soon.
Our water is still working, but the two fridges are no longer cold, even with all the ice we had built up.
The rains were actually heavier than during the hurricane, at least for us.
Later:
It’s cool! Whoo hoo. We can live with this for a while.

Monday:
We got the yard cleaned while it was still cool.

We worked on the glass from the broken windshield and emptied out the nasty stuff from the hot tub.

We’re heading to my parents’ house. They have power and they also have the malls open. Most of their restaurants are open too. And they have plenty of grocery stores open.

No one has much gas though. But we had filled up all our cars before the storm.

Ike

9:30 Our friends left because the wind was picking up and they needed to let the dog out.

10:15 The wind has picked up. Our electricity is going off and on. We don’t have internet now.

10: 25 The lights are going out and staying out for longer. Our friend is asking us if our lights are going off and on.
10:35 The lights are out.
11:00 R is going to bed and wants me to stay up.
3:00 something is hitting our roof.
7:15 My folks are okay.
7:40 My sister Stephanie, who lives three stories over a creek, has water up to her yard. So 20 feet higher.
10:00 The main highways are closed. But my sister decided she would leave anyway. She’s on her way to Austin. She said the highway wasn’t closed where she was, though there were power lines down.
11:30 pm Everyone is asleep but me. It’s hot and I’ve wet down a washcloth and wave it in the air and then lay it on my skin to cool it down.
The neighbor lost a front porch and was lucky at that since she had three or four huge trees come down in her yard.
Others, just a street away, had trees come in their houses.
And we’re told a cold front is coming in tomorrow. (YEAH!) But that it is bringing rain with it. So the flash flood warnings will continue until after the rains.
We’ve played Peanuts (or Nerts) and read books. I walked around the neighborhood a bit, but it is hot and no one else in my family wanted to go outside.
R and I had baloney and cheese sandwiches for dinner. I think the food that is still left in the fridge will be a loss. I’m going to eat cheese for breakfast tomorrow.
The boys had peanut butter sandwiches and pineapple out of a can.
We have food and water for a week, but I hope we’ll get power back sooner. If we’re still without power on Sunday evening, I’m thinking we should head out. Or maybe on Monday morning. Of course, if I have to work on Tuesday, that could be an issue.

Sunday:
It’s hot and raining. I hope the cool air comes soon.
Our water is still working, but the two fridges are no longer cold, even with all the ice we had built up.
The rains were actually heavier than during the hurricane, at least for us.
Later:
It’s cool! Whoo hoo. We can live with this for a while.

Monday:
We got the yard cleaned while it was still cool.

We worked on the glass from the broken windshield and emptied out the nasty stuff from the hot tub.

We’re heading to my parents’ house. They have power and they also have the malls open. Most of their restaurants are open too. And they have plenty of grocery stores open.

No one has much gas though. But we had filled up all our cars before the storm, so it wasn’t a problem for us.

We used the car that was messed up to charge up our cell phones. We certainly weren’t going to be able to drive it around.

Hard Applications: How does he pick where to go?

E is going to college and has been for the last two years. But he is a dual credit student. He started when he was 14. Clearly he is brilliant 😉 but now it is time to apply for colleges.

E doesn’t have a clear idea of what colleges he wants to go to. He does, however, know what he wants to do. He wants to be an actuary.

What we did
So, we went online and found colleges with Actuarial Science programs. Then we went to USNews and got the list of the best actuarial science programs. Then we compared the two. We started, of course, looking for Texas schools. There are four: UT Austin, UT San Antonio, Baylor, and TCU. Only UT Austin is in the best list. E doesn’t want to go to Baylor or TCU of course. (He’s an atheist.) That leaves UTSA as his second choice school. The minimum SAT from a Texas school they want is 920. It’s 1020 if you are homeschooled. So he has almost double the homeschool requirement. I would expect that he will not have any trouble at all getting into UTSA.

We’d like him to go to a good school for actuaries. Then we were looking for family or friends near enough to visit him.

I found a list of supposed good schools, but it is by a prof from ISU, so who knows if ISU really belongs on the system. But the other choices were interesting.

Boston University
University of Central Florida
Florida State University
Georgia State University
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Illinois State University
University of Iowa
Middle Tennessee State University
Pennsylvania State University
Temple University
Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Actuary.com has a list of schools based on whether they have the degree and whether classes support the first “four” exams… It is organized by region, which is nice.

Ball State (Indiana) looks good.
ISU looks good too, based on this website. Maybe it is just really good in Actuarial Science and not so good in others.
Maryville University in St. Louis also looks good. It’s a couple of hours from our friends, which is farther away than I wanted E, but it looks like a possibility. (Their website says it is one of 35 great ones, but it doesn’t say where I can find this list.) Cost, FYI, is $25,000 a year tuition and housing.

R says I’ve been too wimpy, rather than too tough, on the possible places to apply. So Wharton Business School might be added to the places he applies. I honestly can’t imagine him getting in, but I guess it is possible.

NAU, my dad’s alma mater, has a degree too. And according to their website E is guaranteed admission. That, of course, tells us that it is way too easy. I called my dad and he said don’t go. He said he’s glad he got the degree, but it doesn’t have a strong reputation.

Why am I still looking at colleges?

I am still looking because we only had a list of five and some of those are pretty hard to get into. So I am looking for others.

I will love her despite her flaws, instead of hating her despite her greatness.

That is the difference, I find, between what I think of America and what my son, re-learning American history off the left’s internet, believes.

Read the story of how an immigrant child became a radical college student and a disenchanted adult before making the journey to becoming an American. It is brilliantly written. I am sure many will recognize parts of the story from their lives.

Things I need to have on hand to cook with:

We’re emptying the freezer so that we can have food eaten if the electricity goes out. So I’m making a roast. But the recipe I had I can’t find and the others I don’t have the pieces for. I need to keep some basic things on hand that I can use several different ways.

dry onion soup mix

bullion granules

cream of mushroom soup

cream of chicken soup

Hurricane v. 9/11

I went to bed last night and thought that even though the hurricane was scary, I was a lot more scared about 9/11 re-happening. I’m glad we have fended off so many terror attacks.

23 terrorist plots foiled, so far

FoxNews.com has a list of terror plots which were unsuccessful since 9/11.

Here are just a few:

• August 2004, Dhiren Barot: Indian-born leader of terror cell plotted bombings on financial centers (see additional images).

• August 2004, James Elshafay and Shahawar Matin Siraj: Sought to plant bomb at New York’s Penn Station during the Republican National Convention.

• August 2004, Yassin Aref and Mohammed Hossain: Plotted to assassinate a Pakistani diplomat on American soil.

• June 2005, Father and son Umer Hayat and Hamid Hayat: Son convicted of attending terrorist training camp in Pakistan; father convicted of customs violation.

• August 2005, Kevin James, Levar Haley Washington, Gregory Vernon Patterson and Hammad Riaz Samana: Los Angeles homegrown terrorists who plotted to attack National Guard, LAX, two synagogues and Israeli consulate.

• December 2005, Michael Reynolds: Plotted to blow up natural gas refinery in Wyoming, the Transcontinental Pipeline, and a refinery in New Jersey. Reynolds was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

• February 2006, Mohammad Zaki Amawi, Marwan Othman El-Hindi and Zand Wassim Mazloum: Accused of providing material support to terrorists, making bombs for use in Iraq.

Some of the list I had heard of and remembered, like last year’s plot against Fort Dix. Others I don’t remember ever having heard of before.

I am glad they’ve been foiled. I hope we continue to stop them before they kill.

9/11 v. hurricane

My sister is afraid of flying and afraid of storms. We’re in the path of Ike, though it is a category 2, it is a slow moving hurricane with winds of tropical storm level (50 mph) across 275 miles. That means over 24 hours of high winds.

She decided to fly home today, instead of staying for the hurricane.

And she was afraid to fly because it was 9/11. But she was sure it was more likely that we would be hit by the hurricane than that she would be hijacked by terrorists. And she was right.

She arrived home safe and sound.

Remember Laura Gilly

(Reprinted from last year.)

Laura Gilly, age 32, blonde, technical support at Cantor, was killed in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

That’s the most common information available about her on the net. But that is not the sum of Laura Gilly. It isn’t even a very big part.

Steven Kretytak of Newsday wrote:

Raised in Bensonhurst, [a section of Brooklyn, New York City, ed.] Gilly was a cheerleader at Lafayette High School and always had “an effervescent personality,” her mother said. She went to Kingsborough Community College for two years before joining Tower Airlines, which is now defunct.

“She saw places you could never even think of,” her mother said.

Gilly spent nine years traveling to far-flung destinations such as Kuwait, Russia and Thailand. One of her favorite places was Israel, where she could lie on the beach, Fribourg said.

At one point, Gilly lived in Jakarta, Indonesia, for three months to work strictly on flights ferrying Muslims there on a holy pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia.

Gilly lived in Bay Ridge with her two cats. She often went out with the young staff at Cantor, usually on Thursday nights and often to Windows on the World, the restaurant on the 107th floor of Tower One.

And she always relished her times at the shore. There, Gilly would always cap a day in the sun with a night at the bars and clubs. Gilly and her two good friends – Fribourg and Danielle Hoffman – knew everybody, and rarely had to pay for anything, especially at Jenkinson’s, their favorite nightclub, they said.

Hoffman said she calls on Gilly’s constant optimism and happiness to get past some of the sadness of losing her.

“She had such a positive outlook. If you were worried about something stupid, she’d say, ‘Just get over it.'” Hoffman said. “She’d say, ‘I have a choice to be happy or not, and I am going to choose to be happy.'”

Laura Gilly had family who cared for her.

Her mother loved her and spoke of her to the NYTimes.

“She wanted a 9-to-5, so she could make plans without breaking them,” said Phyllis Gilly, her mother. “So many times she wasn’t home for Christmas or New Year’s. She was really looking forward to stability.”

And 16 months ago, she found it in a job working in technical support for Cantor Fitzgerald. Life was finally sweet and somewhat predictable, and Ms. Gilly, 32, was enjoying every minute of it, her mother said, recalling a phone conversation she had with her daughter weeks before Sept. 11.

The joy Mrs. Gilly heard in her daughter’s voice has made it all the more difficult accepting the irony of her death. “We spent so much time worrying about her flying here and there, and to have her go like this: killed by a plane as she sat in an office building. All she wanted was a real job at a desk in a building.”

She had an older brother who loved her and wrote her poetry.

A cousin spoke of her in Riverside.

David Wurtzel said his first cousin, once removed 32-year-old Laura Gilly, had been excited by getting out of the airline business – flying with Tower Airlines – in July and landing a job high above New York’s financial district.
It was – and is – a close-knit family centered in Brooklyn. “We always kept in touch. “(Laura) lived in an apartment two floors above her mom’s.” Mom is Wurtzel’s first cousin….

Laura Gilly had friends who miss her.

Like Ricky.

Laura was a beautiful, bubbly, fun to be around, as well as warm and whole hearted person. … She was the type of person that you did not have to see or talk to , just knowing that when you did, it would feel like it was only yesterday that you had spoken to each other.

And Michelle.

I miss you every day. …I have a son now and I wish everyday you were here to see him. I talk to him about Aunt Laura all the time. … just know how much I always valued our special friendship. There is a place in my heart just for you. I will love you and miss you forvever. Rest in peace precious girl and know that I am raising my chocolate martini to you in heaven.

And Patricia.

Laura was the most caring and giving person I know. … If I could see her one last time, I would thank her for being such a good friend, and for helping me through a hard time.

And Theresa.

Laura Gilly was and will always be a beautiful gift to this world. Her smile would light up the darkest room and her laugh would bring a smile to all in that room.

And Phyllis.

Former Tower Air flight attendant Phyllis Fribourg has heart-shaped piece of blue skirt that belonged to her best friend, Laura Gilly, sewn into bodice of her wedding dress; Gilly, flight attendant who later took desk job at Cantor Fitzgerald, died in attack on World Trade Center.

And Peggy.

Laura was an absolute angel from the very beggining! I cherish every memory I have of her!

Laura Gilly had coworkers who remember her fondly.

Like Gregg.

I trained with Laura at Tower Air and flew with her all over the world for years. What a joy she was and she is deeply missed.

And Monica.

She was very funny. There was an ease about her. It was easy to be her friend and it was easy to talk to her. With laura what you saw is what you got and that was my favorite thing about her. I wish everyone could have known her. I’m happy i did.

And Dawn-Michelle.

I worked/flew with Laura at Tower Air years ago. … Laura was a joyful spirit and probably still is. I think of her often over the years (4 years later, I know). I am sure she’s missed by tons more that were closer to her. It is a pleaure to have known her.

And Niva.

It seems like yesterday we were flying together & getting extented somewhere “Awful” like Paris or Rome. Shopping in Okinawa for the best deals & hanging out on the US base somewhere out there. I miss your smile but carry it in my head & heart at all times. I sometimes still think you are going to call & catch up on old times.

And AnneMarie.

I flew with Laura at Tower Air. There were always good layovers with her on your crew.
Those memories make it like it was yesterday.

And Lisa S.

Tower Air was great because of friends like Laura Gilly. I will never forget her.

And Valerie.

I never saw Laura without a smile on her face. I have read the thoughts of those who knew her also, so I know she truly was happy in her life. This was in part due to her nature and,I’m sure, due to her family. She was surely blessed to have had such a loving family. … I sat 2 seats from here in our last Tower recurrent and that still remains with me. I can still picture her laughing there…….She must have been born with a smile on her face!!!! … She will not be forgotten.

And Lily.

No matter what they threw at us, she just found a way to have a good time. No matter how long the duty day or what far out place in the world we were sent.

And Jose.

I remember your bright smile on your face, your strength, your compassion for life and for whoever had a chance to know you.

Laura Gilly had old schoolmates who heard of her loss and grieved.

Like Gina.

You will always be remembered, I went to JR High School with you and just to know that one of my school mates went through that horror, breaks my heart. You are an Angel and will be in our herats forever.

And Lisa.

In H.S. I remember Laura always laughing and having a good time, just hanging out with friends. I haven’t seen Laura since H.S. but I will always remember what a kind person she was. She will be missed.

2,996 tributes.
One person remembered.
Laura Gilly.

Hurricane Ike is coming.

CC1 is shutting today at 3.

CC2 closed yesterday.

SLAC closes today at 3:30.

Mandatory evacuation for Galveston began yesterday. Mandatory evacuation for parts of Houston were announced at noon.

It looks like we’re going to get hit.